Monthly Archives: July 2017

Higashino, Keigo: “Malice”.

Having enjoyed Higashino’s “Salvation Of A Saint” recently, I checked “Malice” out of the library on my last trip. I got exactly what I was looking for. “Malice” was extremely similar to “Salvation Of A Saint”, which begged the question, is it a wise or unwise move … Continue reading

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Trotsky, Leon: “Terrorism And Communism”.

Published in 1920, this short polemic from Trotsky is a reply to Karl Kautsky’s stinging critique of the Bolsheviks in the first years after their infamous coup d’etat. In practice, it was also a warning to the Mensheviks. Kautsky, considered … Continue reading

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Applebaum, Anne: “Gulag: A History”

Applebaum excavated the brutal Soviet regime in which the levels of systematic and institutional violence inflicted on many of its citizens was incomprehensible. Individuals were not human beings that deserved their own human rights. Rather, they were used as pawns … Continue reading

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St. John Mandel, Emily: “Station Eleven”.  

On a sweltering Saturday afternoon in mid-July, I dropped back the latest batch of books that I had taken out from my local library and checked out “Station Eleven”. I devoured it by early Sunday evening! After 99.9% of the world’s population was … Continue reading

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E.H. Carr: “The Russian Revolution from Lenin to Stalin 1917-1929”.

Carr devoted thirty years of his life to writing the fourteen volume, two million words and arguably the definitive history of twentieth century Russia. This is his magnum opus distilled into two hundred pages. Carr, like Hobsbawn, had a leftist … Continue reading

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Hemingway, Ernest: “Across The River And Into The Trees”.

Hemingway was one of the very finest to do it, maybe the damn finest, as the man himself would say! He gave a voice to the inner thoughts of his characters like none before or since. I felt like I … Continue reading

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O’Mahony, Andy: “Creating Space: The Education Of A Broadcaster”.

O’Mahony has written a meandering, jumbly peregrination through his eventful life. One that started out in 1930s rural Ireland and took him to the Sorbonne, Harvard and Washington DC along the way. The main theme was O’Mahony and Ireland’s intellectual … Continue reading

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