Category Archives: Book review

Conradi, Peter: “Who Lost Russia? How The World Entered A New Cold War”

Why did Russia not democratise after the fall of communism? Peter Conradi puts forward one reason: that Russia lacked the democratic consensus that was a feature of other Eastern European countries that made the transition. Another factor was a lack … Continue reading

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Harris, Jonathan “The Lost World Of Byzantium”

Gazing up at the Columns of the Lion and St. Theodore whilst I was on holiday in Venice, it struck me that I was staring at two extremely rare slabs of history. The statues were stolen from Constantinople during the … Continue reading

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Camus, Albert: “The Outsider”

I’ve always been an optimist at heart. It’s why I rarely read books twice: the next read is the best one. The Outsider, though, is an exception. Camus captures the complexity and simplicity of life in these pages; the “in-between” … Continue reading

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Ellis, Bret Easton: “Glamorama”

Much is justifiably made of how postmodernism has seeped into leftist identity politics. Most notably with the denial of basic biology. We do not hear so much about the postmodern Trumpian right, though. However, Trump is the embodiment of postmodernism. … Continue reading

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Milton, Giles: “Fascinating Footnotes From History”.

An asinine throwaway book of admittedly intriguing historical titbits which at least references one of my favourite novels, The Count Of Monte Cristo. My father gave me his battered, almost spineless old copy of Dumas’s classic whilst we were on … Continue reading

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Nafisi, Azar: “Reading Lolita In Tehran”

Academic and literary critic Azar Nafisi describes the impact that the 1979 Iranian Revolution had on her life in Reading Lolita In Tehran. Before the revolution, Nafisi was comparatively free to read and teach whatever books she chose. This ended when the revolutionaries took … Continue reading

Aside | Posted on by | Leave a comment

Bellow, Saul: “More Die Of Heartbreak”.

“Of course he had seen a great deal, but maybe he hasn’t looked hard enough” speculates Kenneth Trachtenberg about his Uncle Benn, with whom he has an unusually close relationship. Of course, were he to do so, it “would only … Continue reading

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged , | Leave a comment