Category Archives: Books

Findlay, Harry: “Gambling For Life”.

On the 150th anniversary of Dostoevsky’s seminal The Gambler comes the tale of a bettor who lives it every hour of every day. Australian football, rugby, rugby league, dogs, tennis, snooker, horse racing. It is odds of 1.01 that Findlay has … Continue reading

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Philbrick, Nathaniel: “In The Heart Of The Sea”.

This is the real story of the Essex, a ship which set sail from Nantucket in 1820 and upon which, famously, Herman Melville based Moby Dick. As is so frequently the case, the truth is stranger than fiction. Philbrick is … Continue reading

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Pappe, Ilan: “Ten Myths About Israel”

Ilan Pappe takes a sledgehammer to the official narrative that the Israeli state wants people to believe. “Narrative” is a kind way of saying blatant propaganda. That many academics and intellectuals fall for complete fabrications of history that belie the … Continue reading

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Lichtheim, George: “A Brief History Of Socialism”.

George Lichtheim details the history of the word “socialism”, from its 1827 appearance in Robert Owen’s Co-operative Magazine through to its far broader use in the 1970s. Like so many political words and concepts, the term has been rendered somewhat … Continue reading

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Murakami, Haruki: “After The Quake”.

First published In English in 2002 after its Japanese publication in 2000, these six stories from the Japanese master-craftsman deal with the effect that the 1995 Kobe earthquake had on the psyche of a disparate group of individuals in Japan. … Continue reading

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Frankopan, Peter: “The Silk Roads: A New History Of The World”

The first half of Peter Frankopan’s book is a triumph which presents the Eastern history of the world in a clear manner. “It is easy to mould the past into a shape that we find convenient and accessible. But the … Continue reading

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Beatty, Paul: “The Sellout”.

Under the layers of sardonic humour in which Beatty has wrapped “The Sellout” lies an important message: racism is alive and well in the United States. The novel is set in Dickens, LA, where “one’s self-worth comes from how one … Continue reading

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